The Way We Spell

I have been thinking a lot about spelling since Indiana’s ISTEP testing starts tomorrow.  It is hard to get it through to the kids that as long as they can get their ideas across in their writing, their spelling won’t count against them too much.  They get caught up in the editing and lose track of their ideas.

In that vein, I saw this post and thought I would share it.  There are some spelling rules, particularly concerning the doubling of consonants when adding a suffix, that still give me trouble.  A while ago I wrote this post on English spelling difficulties, and then I saw this on The Fire Wire.

Mr. Rondthaler makes a good point, does he not?

The answer to my spelling woes appears to be this rule:

The best way to remember when to double the last letter is to remember the “C-V-C rule.” The C-V-C says that if you are adding a suffix (letters added to the end of a word, like the –ed in happened) to a word, first look at the last three letters of the word. If those three letters are consonant-vowel-consonant, then double the last letter of the word.

If only I could remember it on the spur of the moment!  I have to admit, I often resort to the dictionary.

What about you?  Are there any spelling rules that you need to remember?  And do you think English spelling is d-u-m?

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2 Responses to “The Way We Spell”


  1. 1 Sally September 15, 2008 at 6:15 pm

    I know one thing: English is tough!

  2. 2 Bluestocking September 16, 2008 at 3:42 pm

    All I remember is i before e except after c or when sounding like a as in neighbor and weigh.


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